The Organic Standard is an international monthly journal that enables individuals and organisations to keep up-to-date on development concerning worldwide standards and certification issues in the organic sector.

The first issue of Organic Standard (TOS) was published in April 2001, and since then an issue has been published once a month.

The journal has a growing number of subscribers representing certification bodies, standard setters, sector bodies, governments, consultancies and industry. It has become widely recognised as the credible source of international news and analysis for organic standards setting, certification, regulation and accreditation. The journal has different sections such as Certification & accreditation, Standards & regulation, Updates and opinion, Country focus reports among others.

NEWS SHORTS

NEW SUPPORT SERVICE LAUNCHED TO HELP FARMERS CONSIDERING ORGANIC

Abacus Agriculture, an independent farm consultancy service, and Organic Farmers and Growers (OF&G) have launched a support service to provide free advice and technical guidance to organic farmers and those considering organic conversion as an option for their farms. The objective is to help farmers decide whether organic conversion is right for their farm business. Source: OF&G. 

NOP AMENDMENTS TO THE NATIONAL LIST

The National Organic Program (NOP) has amended the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances (National List) for crops, livestock and handling. The amendments include not only restrictions for 17 substances on the National List used for organic, but also the addition of 16 new substances to be allowed in organic production or handling. Source: Federal Register/ Vol. 83, No. 247. 

BAN ON CERTAIN DISPOSABLE PLASTIC PRODUCTS APPROVED BY EU PARLIAMENT

The European Parliament has approved a law banning single use plastic items, including straws, cotton swabs and disposable plastic plates and cutlery, by 2021. The ban also includes lower CO2 limits for vehicles, new recycling targets and the strengthening of the polluter pays principle. In that sense, producers of plastic fishing gear will be required to cover the costs of waste collection in ports. 

NEW CODES OF PRACTICE FOR END USERS ON THE SPREADING OF POULTRY LITTER

A new code of practice for end users has been released by the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM), with regard to the spreading of poultry litter. According to the code, end users should only accept poultry litter from poultry farmers who have adequate systems in place to ensure that poultry carcasses are removed from poultry houses and disposed of in accordance with legislation. Additionally, poultry litter containing dead birds must not be land-spread. Source: Soil Association

Top